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Trump Trade War Fallout Could Haunt U.S. Soy Farmers for Years

BLoomberg | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Agriculture News

If history is any guide, the trade war with China will have lasting affects for U.S. farmers and their soybean crops that the president won’t be boasting about. Donald Trump is set to meet Xi Jinping, his counterpart in China, at the G-20 summit and traders are optimistic for a resolution. But a flashback to Richard Nixon’s 1973 soybean embargo and Jimmy Carter’s 1980 Soviet grain ban suggest that what’s already happened this year may lead to permanent changes ahead as China seeks alternatives to the U.S. market."It’s possible that China will never fully trust the U.S.


Brucellosis reported in Wyoming

Jackson Hole News and Guide | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Agriculture News

 rare disease has popped up in a Teton County cattle herd. The Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory and the National Veterinary Services Laboratory found five cows infected with brucellosis, a bacterial disease that can pass from wild animals to cattle, according to a press release from the Wyoming Livestock Board. The disease causes cattle, elk and bison to abort their pregnancies. All reported cases in Wyoming since 1988 were caused by transmission from wildlife to livestock.

 


These wild monkeys thrive in Florida—and carry a deadly virus

National Geographic | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Rural News

n the heart of central Florida lies Silver Spring State Park—a large patchwork of forests and wetlands with a spring-fed river flowing through it. One of Florida’s first tourist attractions, the park was once known for its scenic vistas and native wildlife. But for the last 80 years, the park’s biggest draw has been its monkeys.That’s right—Silver Spring State Park is home to at least 300 rhesus macaques, a monkey native to south and southeast Asia.


Farmers Seek Additional Markets for Soy, While Fears Grow for Lasting Trade Impacts

Farm Policy News | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Agriculture News

U.S. farmers would need about 11,000 markets the size of Sri Lanka to replace Chinese soybean purchases, but these days many growers will take any shred of new business they can get. A small but growing number of farmers have all but given up waiting for diplomatic solutions and started scrambling themselves to help open new markets and salvage existing ones disrupted by tariffs, according to dozens of interviews with producers, industry officials and trade lobbying groups.“Outside of China, foreign soybean importers have capitalized on bargain-priced U.S. supplies.


China reports first case of African swine fever in animal feed

South China Morning Post | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in News

Discovery follows first outbreak in six weeks at a pig farm in southeastern province of Anhui, Fears raised the disease will spread further across the country


Ohio commission delays Lake Erie protections ordered by Gov. John Kasich

Cleveland.com | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Agriculture, SARL Members and Alumni News

A state commission declined Thursday morning to designate eight Lake Erie watersheds as distressed, which would have set in motion requirements to protect the water against toxic algae blooms.The Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission instead decided that the rules to protect Lake Erie should be written with input from the agriculture community before the distressed designation will be approved at a Feb. 15 meeting.The decision is the latest in the tug-of-war over the protections between Gov.


ADM looks to buy Argentina soy crusher Molinos Agro

Watt AgNet | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Agriculture News

Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) has approached Argentina-based soy crusher Molinos Agro about buying its livestock feed and soy oil manufacturing plant, according to a Reuters report. A spokesman for the Perez Companc business group, which controls Molinos Agro, said the company has been approached several times by potential buyers and the offers were rejected. But Reuters reported that discussions between ADM and Molinos Agro began last year and then stalled over the price.Trade tensions between the U.S. and China have given U.S.


Deepwater Horizon oil spill's dramatic effect on stingrays' sensory abilities

Science Daily | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Energy News

Marine fishes rely on their sensory systems to survive. A study is the first to quantify the physiological effects of whole crude oil on the olfactory function of a marine vertebrate -- the Atlantic stingray. Results of the study, confirm that exposure to crude oil, at concentrations mimicking those measured in coastal areas following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, significantly impaired olfactory function in the Atlantic stingray after just 48 hours of exposure.


Scientists: Wind, drought worsen fires, not bad management

AP News | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Rural News

Both nature and humans share blame for California’s devastating wildfires, but forest management did not play a major role, despite President Donald Trump’s claims, fire scientists say.


Massachusetts raw milk dairy suspends production for antibiotic traces

Food Safety News | Posted onNovember 15, 2018 in Food News

Nick Hoffman and family practice Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) at Hoffman Farm in Franklin, MA, offer fresh vegetables, eggs and raw milk to shareholders who pay $615 every week.But earlier this month, Hoffman Farm ran into a snag in its bucolic business plan. Raw milk sold by Hoffman tested positive for traces of antibiotics.The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) does not tolerate any amount of antibiotics in milk, not even a smidgen.


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