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AgClips for January 10, 2019

AgClips

Agclips for the week ending March 25, 2019

This Week's AgClips

About 2.6 Billion Gallons of Biofuels Now Exempted From RFS Requirements

DTN | Posted on March 21, 2019 in Energy News

The EPA granted five additional 2017 small-refinery exemptions (SREs) to the Renewable Fuel Standard on Thursday, raising the agency total for that year to 34, according to an update posted to EPA's online dashboard. The dashboard also indicates it has two more waiver requests pending for that year. Ethanol industry interests, farmers and federal lawmakers were hopeful the agency would change the way it considered waivers under new Administrator Andrew Wheeler.

FDA Chief Warns CBD Rulemaking Could Take Years Without Congressional Action

Marijuana Moment | Posted on March 21, 2019 in Federal News

The outgoing head of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) suggested on Tuesday that it would take several years for the agency to come up with rules around allowing hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD) in food products—unless Congress steps in. At a Brookings Institution event, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb recognized that there’s strong interest among the cannabis industry and lawmakers in developing a regulatory framework through which CBD from hemp could be extracted, sold and introduced into the food supply.

US eases land restrictions meant to protect Sage Grouse in West

AP News | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Federal, Rural News

 The Trump administration on Friday finalized changes to sweeping federal land use plans for the West, easing restrictions on energy companies and other industries in a way officials said would still protect a struggling bird species. The Trump administration on Friday finalized changes to sweeping federal land use plans for the West, easing restrictions on energy companies and other industries in a way officials said would still protect a struggling bird species.

NEW ZEALAND SHOOTINGPOLITICSU.S. NEWSBUSINESSWORLDTECH & MEDIATHINKSPORTS SHARE THIS — U.S. NEWS Food stamp changes would mainly hurt those living in extreme poverty, study finds

NBC News | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Rural News

The Trump administration’s proposed rule change to food stamp work requirements could leave hundreds of thousands of the most financially vulnerable Americans without the monthly assistance that allows them to purchase food, a new study finds.But approximately 755,000 people across the country would not meet the new work requirements and lose eligibility in three months, according to the USDA’s own estimates, and various states would see different degrees of impact.

Study: Slower-growing birds would harm environment

Watt Ag Net | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture News

A new study estimates as many as 68 percent more slower-growing broiler birds would be needed to produce the same amount of breast meat as conventional birds.

Gene Editing helps blind mice see

Gene Engineering News | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture News

When a team of scientists delivered the gene for a retinal opsin into the genome of the ganglion cells of blind mice, the mice acquired vision that lasted a lifetime. “That this system works is really, really satisfying, in part because it’s also very simple,” noted Ehud Isacoff, PhD, professor of neurobiology at the University of California (UC), Berkeley, and lead author on the paper. “Ironically, you could have done this 20 years ago.” 

Chinese Dairy Leader Purchases New Zealand’s Major Milk Supply Co-Operative

CX Live | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture News

Chinese dairy behemoth Yili announced on Monday that it will buy New Zealand’s second largest dairy co-operative, Westland, in cash for no more than NZ$246 million 

Jurors say Roundup contributed to a 2nd man's cancer. Now thousands more cases against Monsanto await

CNN | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture News

A federal jury dealt a huge blow to Monsanto, saying its popular weedkiller Roundup was a substantial factor in causing a California man's cancer.It's the second time in eight months that a jury has reached such a decision.But Edwin Hardeman's case against Monsanto is the first to be tried in federal court. And thousands of similar cases are still pending at the federal or state level.

Debt Figures Raise Questions of Whether Farm Debt is on Cruise Control

DTN | Posted on March 20, 2019 in News

Iowa attorney Joe Peiffer spent the latter half of February helping some of his clients try to restructure debt and get operating loans for 2019 after these farmers found out their past lenders weren't going to continue financing them. "Right now, we're having many people find out shortly before they have to pay rent that they aren't going to have financing," said Peiffer, who works with farmers in Iowa and Illinois.Some of these farmers needed millions to pay rent. Peiffer said they didn't all get financing.

Maine senator revives ‘red flag’ bill to allow confiscation of guns from people who pose threat

Press Herald | Posted on March 20, 2019 in SARL Members and Alumni News

The measure sponsored by Democrat Rebecca Millett of Cape Elizabeth would allow police and family members to seek a court order to temporarily disarm someone in mental health crisis

Delaware Senate approves raising age to buy tobacco products

Delaware on line | Posted on March 20, 2019 in SARL Members and Alumni News

The state Senate has approved a bill raising the legal age to buy tobacco products in Delaware from 18 to 21. A bill was approved on a 14-6 vote Tuesday and now goes to the House.The legislation would apply to all tobacco products and tobacco substitutes, including e-cigarettes and vaping devices.

Background check on all gun sales in NH means dealers must broker private transactions;

Union Leader | Posted on March 20, 2019 in SARL Members and Alumni News

The New Hampshire House on Tuesday passed two gun control bills, one requiring background checks for all firearms sales and another imposing a waiting period between the purchase and delivery of a gun.The Democratic majority in the House also defeated a Republican sponsored bill that would have expanded the state’s “Stand Your Ground” law to allow the use of deadly force in defending a third party or “other” against any felony offense.HB 109, requiring universal background checks, passed 203-148, along mostly partisan lines.

Hawaii bills push 1st state ban on plastics in restaurants

AP News | Posted on March 20, 2019 in SARL Members and Alumni News

Hawaii would be the first state in the U.S. to ban most plastics at restaurants under legislation that aims to cut down on waste that pollutes the ocean. Dozens of cities nationwide have banned plastic foam containers, but Hawaii’s measure targeting fast-food and full-service restaurants would make it the first state to do so. The liberal state has a history of prioritizing the environment — it’s mandated renewable energy use and prohibited sunscreen ingredients that harm coral.

American pigs and cattle are ‘vulnerable’ to deadly foot-and-mouth disease, federal government agency warns

CNBC | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture News

America’s swine and cattle populations are vulnerable to the deadly and highly contagious foot-and-mouth disease, and “efforts to prepare for a potential outbreak could be strengthened,” according to a U.S. government watchdog.The Government Accountability Office suggested that “efforts to prepare for a potential outbreak could be strengthened.”The agency warned an outbreak in the U.S. could lead to “serious economic impacts,” including putting at risk some $19 billion in exports of meats and dairy products.

FDA issues update on possible tie between grain-free diets and heart disease

Veterinary 360 | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Food News

The FDA has issued an update to its investigation into reports of dogs developing dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) while eating certain pet foods, according to a release from the agency. Since first announcing it would investigate the issue in July 2018, the agency has analyzed reports it has received from January 1, 2014, through November 30, 2018.

Brazil move opens door to U.S. wheat imports

Capital Press | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Federal News

A new agreement between the U.S. and Brazil means U.S. wheat farmers will compete on a level playing field to sell their crop to that South American nation. U.S. Wheat Associates and the National Association of Wheat Growers welcomed the news that Brazil has agreed to a duty-free tariff rate quota for wheat, a longstanding obligation under that nation’s World Trade Organization commitments.The agreement opens an annual opportunity for U.S.

Resources for Animal Food Producers in Flooded Central & Southern Plains of U.S.

FDA | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture News

As the Central and Southern Plains of the United States continue to experience extreme weather and flooding, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine reminds animal food producers who may be mixing, storing or distributing grains and other foods for animals about information resources available. While there are few, if any, crops growing right now, previously harvested crops or siloed feed materials could become contaminated and no longer suitable for feeding.

Oregon House approves 10-year ban on ‘fracking’

AP News | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Energy News

The Oregon House approved a 10-year ban on fracking to explore for oil and natural gas. Lawmakers voted 42-12 on Monday to prohibit the process, which injects high-pressure liquids into underground rock to extract oil and gas. The measure now goes to the Senate for consideration.There are currently no fracking operations in Oregon. But developers say there’s potential for coalbed methane extraction in the Willamette Valley, which this bill would also block.

As Home-Cooked Cottage-Food Industry Grows, States Work to Keep Up

Pew Trust | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Food, SARL Members and Alumni News

As more consumers shop at farmers markets and “eat local,” U.S. local food sales, including cottage-food sales, have soared from $5 billion annually in 2008 to a projected $20 billion this year.

The curious case of tainted milk from a Maine dairy farm

Reuters | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Food News

For Maine dairy farmer Fred Stone, the discovery in 2016 that his cows were producing tainted milk has since brought financial ruin and threatened to shut down a century-old family business.  Now state regulators and health experts are investigating whether the contamination could reflect a much broader problem for farms that used similar methods to fertilize their land.The chemicals on Stone’s farm likely came from biosolids, or nutrient-rich sewage from municipal utilities, that he spread across his fields, according to a report last year by Maine’s Department of Environmental Protection

George W. Bush: 'Immigration is a blessing and a strength'

CNN | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Rural News

Former President George W. Bush appeared at a naturalization ceremony Monday where he praised the nation's immigrant history and called on lawmakers to deliver comprehensive immigration reform."America's elected representatives have a duty to regulate who comes in and when," Bush said at the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, where dozens took the oath of allegiance to become citizens. "In meeting this responsibility, it helps to remember that America's immigrant history made us who we are.

Supreme Court will take up immigration-related case next term

CNN | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Federal News

The Supreme Court agreed on Monday to hear a case next term concerning Kansas' prosecution of three undocumented immigrants for using stolen Social Security numbers in an effort to gain employment.Those convictions were overturned when the Kansas Supreme Court ruled that the federal immigration law at issue preempts a state from prosecuting undocumented immigrants, when the basis of the claim comes from information that has been culled from federal immigration forms.The case raises the question about the extent to which federal immigration law preempts states from also trying to enforce imm

Trump sends US officials to investigate land expropriation in South Africa

Business Tech | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Federal News

A number of US officials visited South Africa at the request of President Donald Trump as part of an investigation into the country’s land expropriation process. Trump raised eyebrows in 2018 after he tweeted that the South African government was ‘seizing land from white farmers’.Trump asked his secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, to study the seizure and expropriation of land in South Africa, along with the killing of farmers.

Farm, biofuels groups upset by more refinery waivers on Ag Day

The Fence Post | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Energy News

Corn and biofuels groups are upset that the Environmental Protection Agency chose March 14, which was National Agriculture Day, to grant five additional Renewable Fuel Standard Small Refinery Exemptions for the 2017 compliance year, waiving 366 million gallons of biofuels from RFS compliance. "EPA's decision today brings the total waivers from 2016 and 2017 RFS obligations to 53, amounting to 2.61 billion ethanol-equivalent gallons.

Colorado Lawmakers Introduce Blockchain Agriculture Bill

ETH News | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture, SARL Members and Alumni News

On Friday, March 15, lawmakers from the state of Colorado introduced a bipartisan bill calling for the study of how blockchain technology might be applied to the state's agricultural industry. House Bill 1247 is championed in the house by representatives Donald Valdez and Mark Catlin, with state senators Kerry Donovan and Don Coram also sponsoring.

Georgia legislators pass oyster farming bill

Savannah Now | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture, SARL Members and Alumni News

Georgia lawmakers on Monday passed legislation to create an oyster farming industry in the state despite opposition from fishermen and environmentalists who consider it too restrictive. With a vote of 35-19 in the senate, H.B. 501, which passed the house last week, now goes to the desk of Gov. Brian Kemp.

Wyoming Department of Agriculture begins work on industrial hemp program

The Fence Post | Posted on March 20, 2019 in SARL Members and Alumni News

The Wyoming Department of Agriculture is beginning the process of regulating industrial hemp in Wyoming following the passage of HB171/HEA No. 0110 and Gov. Mark Gordon's signature.

When it comes to monarchs, fall migration matters

Science Daily | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Rural News

New research shows that a critical piece of the butterfly's annual cycle was missing -- the fall migration.Scientists studying monarch butterflies have traditionally focused on two sources for their decline -- winter habitat loss in Mexico and fewer milkweed plants in the Midwest.New research conducted by Michigan State University and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, however, shows that a critical piece of the butterfly's annual cycle was missing -- the fall migration.

Snowmelt, Rain Wreak Havoc on US River Systems

DTN | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Agriculture News

While the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) remains in winter hibernation, the rest of the river system is overflowing with excess water from snowmelt and recent rains. The flooding is preventing barges from moving grain and fertilizer for spring planting.

Solar Jobs By State 2018

The Solar Foundation | Posted on March 20, 2019 in Energy News

The National Solar Jobs 2018 tracks solar employment nationwide and state by state. Below is complete information on solar jobs for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico in 2018.

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