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SARL Members and Alumni News

Canada pipeline waiting on New Hampshire

Utility Dive | Posted on March 8, 2018

Canada's National Energy Board has approved Hydro-Quebec's application to construct an international transmission line to New Hampshire as part of the disputed Northern Pass transmission project. In January, Massachusetts selected Northern Pass to help the state meet its clean energy goals, but the project was rejected unanimously by the New Hampshire Site Evaluation Committee the following month. Massachusetts has since indicated that it will select Central Maine Power's New England Clean Energy Connect (NECEC) transmission line to replace Northern Pass if it doesn't secure a permit from New Hampshire in the next three weeks. Both projects involve partnerships with Hydro-Quebec to deliver clean energy from Canada to the U.S.


Perdue and Delaware come to terms

Meat + Poultry | Posted on March 8, 2018

Perdue Foods and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) have reached an agreement in which Perdue will pay an administrative penalty of $77,300 and an associated $7,601 assessment for expenses associated with the DNREC’s investigation into the company’s violations of its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit.


Iowa tax reform bill puts solar tax credit on the chopping block

Energy News | Posted on March 8, 2018

A tax credit that’s helped motivate many fiscally conscious Iowa farmers to install solar panels would see an early demise under a sweeping tax reform bill that cleared a major legislative hurdle. Iowa is the only state in the Midwest and one of just a dozen nationally that still offers a state solar tax credit. The Iowa Legislature created the 15 percent tax credit in 2012. Since then it’s provided a total of $21.6 million in incentives for nearly 4,000 projects.


Washington state passes net neutrality law as states push back against the FCC

NBC News | Posted on March 8, 2018

Washington became the first state to pass a law making it illegal for internet service providers to manipulate their networks for money. Dozens of other states are considering similar measures through legislation and lawsuits. Governors in Montana, Hawaii, New York, New Jersey and Vermont have all signed executive orders on the issue.  There's just one problem: The new rules passed by the Federal Communications Commission in December, in a 3-2 vote along party lines, pre-empt states from making their own net neutrality laws. The FCC's new rules will officially go into effect on April 23, according to a notice published last month in the Federal Register. Washington's law, which had bipartisan support, doesn't take effect until June 6. Experts expect it could face legal challenges. "This is symbolic politics, because the states know it is illegal to do," Roslyn Layton, a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, told NBC News. "But they can put rules on the book and make it look like they're doing something."

 


Commissioner Sid Miller prevails in three-way GOP race

The Texas Tribune | Posted on March 8, 2018

Sid Miller maintained about 56 percent of the vote in a three-way race to lead a department whose wide-ranging responsibilities include inspecting lottery balls and running the federal school lunch program.


Resolution introduced into the Illinois House admonishes the Humane Society

Illinois General Assembly | Posted on March 7, 2018

According to the tax documents of the Humane Society of the United States, as well as other independent analyses, the national organization renowned for animal rights donated less than one percent of their $132 million budget to help care for actual animals in 2016; and members of this chamber should be encouraging the residents of Illinois to research other local humane societies that are completely unaffiliated with the National organization; residents of Illinois will find that these independent humane societies do not receive many donations and rely primarily on dedicated volunteers to care for the animals;


Idaho, 10 other states back Washington in culvert appeal

Capital Press | Posted on March 7, 2018

States across the country argue that if Washington loses Supreme Court case, land uses from coast-to-coast will be vulnerable to lawsuits.  Eleven states from around the U.S. argue that if Washington loses its case in the U.S. Supreme Court over culverts, land-use rules across the country will be at risk of being subordinate to tribal treaty rights. The states, led by Idaho, filed a brief with the high court March 2 supporting Washington’s appeal of a court order to replace more than 800 fish-blocking culverts. The order provides a script for challenging anything that could harm tribal fishing and hunting in their states, according to Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden and colleagues.


Veterinarians want freedom to recommend like medical doctors

The Sacramento Bee | Posted on March 6, 2018

Unlike medical doctors in California, veterinarians are prohibited under state law from discussing cannabis as a treatment option for pets. That would change under a bill recently proposed by Assemblymember Ash Kalra, D-San Jose. AB 2215 would have the state Veterinary Medical Board come up with guidelines for discussing marijuana treatment and “protect state-licensed veterinarians from disciplinary action for discussing the use of cannabis on animal patient clients.” The bill is sponsored by the California Veterinary Medical Association.


Rural prosperity center jumps hurdle

Valdosta Daily Times | Posted on March 6, 2018

A plan to create an academic center focusing on the needs of rural Georgia cleared a milestone, but conversations about funding still await lawmakers. House lawmakers overwhelmingly approved the measure, sending it to the Senate. The proposal comes from the House Rural Development Council, which has offered several bills aimed at addressing the woes of rural Georgia.  Shaw’s measure creates the Center for Rural Prosperity and Innovation, which would be housed within a university that offers a bachelor’s in rural community development – a requirement that appears to favor Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton. 


Oregon sues to shut down new mega-dairy, citing repeated manure spills

edairynews | Posted on March 6, 2018

Lost Valley Farm opened in April 2017 near Boardman along the Columbia River in north central Oregon to supply the Tillamook County Creamery Association, which makes Tillamook Cheese. Its wastewater permit allows up to 30,000 animals and 187 million gallons of manure per year.Regulators approved the dairy despite objections from about 4,000 people and a dozen state and national health and environment organizations raising concerns about air and water pollution, water use and health impacts on nearby communities.Since then the dairy has failed numerous inspections, has been cited four times and has been fined $10,640.Each citation included steps the dairy was required to take to remain in operation. Each time, the dairy failed to comply with most of those requirements, the Oregon Department of Agriculture said in the lawsuit filed last week. As a result, liquid manure and wastewater has repeatedly overflowed storage lagoons and seeped into soil. The lawsuit seeks an immediate and permanent injunction prohibiting the dairy from creating any more wastewater.


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