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Economists say ERS move penny-wise, dollar-foolish

The American Statistical Association and 41 other economic institutes have issued a statement saying USDA’s decision to move the Economic Research Service out of Washington, DC, will drive a brain drain from a vital research component in the nation's $1 trillion food, agriculture, and rural economy.

Animal rights activists attempting “outreach” to truck drivers

As soon as stopping trucks to hold “vigils” at meat processing plants became the latest activist trend, I knew it was only a matter of time before an activist claimed to get injured. It’s pretty clear why a few people gathering around a semi full of livestock (usually at dawn) isn’t really the safest course of action.

USDA, FDA to hold joint meeting on cell culture technology

The topic of cell culture technology and the products produced from it is a controversial one throughout the industry as well as in Washington. US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and US Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb on Sept. 10 announced a joint public meeting Oct. 23-24 to focus on the potential hazards, oversight considerations, and labeling of cell cultured food products derived from livestock and poultry. The public meeting will be held on Oct. 23 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Oct. 24 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Salmonella outbreak in Alabama free range layer operation

he Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the US Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis infections linked to Gravel Ridge Farms cage-free large eggs. Cullman, Alabama-based Gravel Ridge issued a recall on Sept. 8 for packages of a dozen and 2.5 dozen eggs in cardboard containers with the UPC code 7-06970-38444-6. The recalled eggs also had “best if used by” dates of July 25, 2018, through Oct.

California to rely on 100% clean electricity by 2045

All of California’s electricity will come from clean power sources by 2045 under legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday, the latest in a series of ambitious goals set by the state to combat the effects of climate change.Brown hailed the move as another example of the state’s global leadership on environmental initiatives as the Trump administration backs away from such policies.

Northern U.S. states lead the way with community solar projects

1,023 megawatts of community solar have been installed in the U.S. as of Q1 2018, according to a recent report, enough to power roughly 150,000–200,000 homes. Massachusetts, New York, Minnesota and Colorado are leading the way in providing community solar resources for their communities. The details: Community solar refers to both community-owned solar installations and third-party-owned installations that allow anyone in the area to access the energy and , in some cases, obtain energy credits toward their electric bills.

Plant would convert Kansas wheat straw to natural gas. Why do some oppose it?

A renewable-energy company wants to invest more than $100 million in a biofuel plant in Kansas that it estimates would create 225 jobs and generate $3.5 million a year for area farmers. But some Sumner County farmers and others in the area are concerned about what the plant could mean for their water supply. The VNA Corp.’s proposed plant would turn water and baled crop residue — such as wheat straw and corn leaves, stalks and cobs— into natural gas.

She Grew Up Poor on a Kansas Farm. Her Memoir Is an Attempt to Understand Why.

Sarah Smarsh’s memoir, “Heartland,” opens with a perplexing ode to an imaginary baby. “I’m glad you never ended up as a physical reality in my life. But we talked for so many years that I don’t guess I’ll ever stop talking to you.” Throughout the book an apparition of the author’s unborn child pops into the prose like Ally McBeal’s Baby Cha-Cha, inducing the otherwise sage Smarsh to write in the inexorably sentimental second person.Smarsh escaped poverty, she believes, because, unlike her mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, she didn’t become a teenage mom.

Detention of Migrant Children Has Skyrocketed to Highest Levels Ever

Even though hundreds of children separated from their families after crossing the border have been released under court order, the overall number of detained migrant children has exploded to the highest ever recorded — a significant counternarrative to the Trump administration’s efforts to reduce the number of undocumented families coming to the United States.Population levels at federally contracted shelters for migrant children have quietly shot up more than fivefold since last summer, according to data obtained by The New York Times, reaching a total of 12,800 this month.

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